23 Jun

Whitewashing Terrorism

150622_POL_JindalConfederateFlag.jpg.CROP.promo-mediumlarge

Whitewashing Terrorism

Republicans have firm rules for fighting terrorism—unless it’s committed by domestic racists.

The Republican Party has a clear philosophy on fighting terrorism. First, we must prioritize the fight. Second, we must challenge the teachings that motivate terror. Third, we must confront separatists who promote these ideas in our own country. Fourth, we must monitor networks that fund radicalization and violence.

Unless, of course, the terrorism is committed by white nationalists. In that case, the rules don’t apply.

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2015/06/the_charleston_shooting_republicans_have_firm_rules_for_fighting_terrorism.html

03 May

Boeing 787 Dreamliners contain a potentially catastrophic software bug

Boeing_costs

The memo doesn’t provide additional details about the underlying software bug. Informed speculation suggests it’s a signed 32-bit integer overflow that is triggered after 231 centiseconds (i.e. 248.55 days) of continuous operation.

http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/05/01/boeing-787-dreamliners-contain-a-potentially-catastrophic-software-bug/

28 Apr

Why Baltimore Burned

x-e1430227410343-1940x1090

Do you know why Baltimore burned on Monday? Blame pent-up anger over police brutality and the mysterious death of Freddie Gray. And blame the disgusting looters who robbed stores and beat up reporters — in broad daylight. But the real culprit isn’t a new problem. For decades, Baltimore has struggled to solve persistent inequality that puts people down — and keeps them down.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/dandiamond/2015/04/28/why-baltimore-burned/

22 Apr

You’ve Been Making Your Hard-Boiled Eggs All Wrong

2de03228eac6493f24ea9332

The technique is beneficial for several reasons. Since the eggs are placed in a shallow basket rather than a deep pot of simmering water, they’re less likely to crack. The steam will evenly cook the eggs and won’t ruffle them around like the tenacious bubbles of boiling water.

The whole method is wildly simple. The best part? Steaming the egg takes the same amount of time as boiling, so there’s no reason not to give it a try.

Original Article on HuffPo

 

22 Apr

Using Power Efficiently; Cooking with a Steamer

11182536_10152858841998753_9051714666950574873_o
11182536_10152858841998753_9051714666950574873_oWe went solar last year, and as part of that initiative I am looking for new ways to save power since power now literally = $$$ for us. My wife cooks for the family, a lot. One of our largest uses of power is the electric range, so I am endeavoring to find options.
 
I’ve started experimenting with a steamer, not a hugely efficient device, but compared to the stove, it is.
 
So far, I am happy with the results…this image shows the power from two meals cooked…only 0.26kwh of power…I used it again this morning for breakfast…up to 0.42 including any loss from leaving it plugged in all night, which I should not have done. :)
03 Apr

How should the FDA regulate homeopathic remedies?

IMG_2361

Homeopathy is one of those topics that provides much exasperation for me. I don’t understand how such a concept has become so prominent in our modern society. Homeopathy is pure bunk. When you buy a homeopathic remedy, you are buying water, or sugar or some other benign substance. You are not buying medication.

IMG_2361 IMG_2362

Rescue Energy and Rescue Sleep…two products with absolutely diametrically opposed needs…with the identical ingredients. Imagine one pill to help you sleep, and the same pill to help you stay awake.

So the question arises…should the FDA regulate homeopathy? I don’t know what I think about that. On one hand, I think anything marketed as a remedy or a medicine for health issues should be regulated. But homeopathy…isn’t a medicine. So should it be regulated? Does regulating it give it credibility? Does not regulating it, condone it? I don’t know.

ScienceBasedMedicine.org has a great article on this very topic.

03 Apr

Orthorexia nervosa: when righteous eating becomes an obsession

image-20150302-16157-1fqdf5

Orthorexia nervosa, the “health food eating disorder”, gets its name from the Greek word ortho, meaning straight, proper or correct. This exaggerated focus on food can be seen today in some people who follow lifestyle movements such as “raw”, “clean” and “paleo”.

American doctor Steven Bratman coined the term “orthorexia nervosa” in 1997 some time after his experience in a commune in upstate New York. It was there he developed an unhealthy obsession with eating “proper” food:

All I could think about was food. But even when I became aware that my scrabbling in the dirt after raw vegetables and wild plants had become an obsession, I found it terribly difficult to free myself. I had been seduced by righteous eating.

Bratman’s description draws parallels with many modern dietary fads that promise superior health by restricting whole food groups without a medical reason or even a valid scientific explanation.